The Issaquah High Times

Perusing Your Passions  

PASSION+FOR+PROFESSION+Two+out+of+three+Americans+report+not+feeling+engaged+with+their+current+job.+Individuals+often+choose+other+factors%2C+including+salary+and+employee+benefits%2C+over+perusing+a+profession+they+are+genuinely+interested+in.+People+also+fear+changing+jobs+as%2C+in+their+minds%2C+potential+financial+risks+outweigh+doing+what+they+love.+
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Perusing Your Passions  

PASSION FOR PROFESSION Two out of three Americans report not feeling engaged with their current job. Individuals often choose other factors, including salary and employee benefits, over perusing a profession they are genuinely interested in. People also fear changing jobs as, in their minds, potential financial risks outweigh doing what they love.

PASSION FOR PROFESSION Two out of three Americans report not feeling engaged with their current job. Individuals often choose other factors, including salary and employee benefits, over perusing a profession they are genuinely interested in. People also fear changing jobs as, in their minds, potential financial risks outweigh doing what they love.

Mimi Gaudiano

PASSION FOR PROFESSION Two out of three Americans report not feeling engaged with their current job. Individuals often choose other factors, including salary and employee benefits, over perusing a profession they are genuinely interested in. People also fear changing jobs as, in their minds, potential financial risks outweigh doing what they love.

Mimi Gaudiano

Mimi Gaudiano

PASSION FOR PROFESSION Two out of three Americans report not feeling engaged with their current job. Individuals often choose other factors, including salary and employee benefits, over perusing a profession they are genuinely interested in. People also fear changing jobs as, in their minds, potential financial risks outweigh doing what they love.

Savannah Wood, Copy Editor

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When I was younger I wanted to be a veterinarian; I loved my pet dog and wanted to be surrounded by animals for the rest of my life. I quickly realized the flaw in my plan, however, when I almost fainted on an airplane while watching the shark attack in the movie “Soul Surfer.” As I grew up, my ideal dream job fluctuated as I was exposed to more potential careers. My peers fantasized about one day becoming firefighters, doctors and even international rock stars.

As individuals grow older, they begin to realize that some jobs entail more than what was initially perceived. Freshman Julianna Smith agrees and says, “It’s like being a programmer; the idea of it is amazing as you’re creating things, but then you realize you have to learn all these different types of code in order to do that.” People are often in awe of the concept or final result of a particular job, but are often not willing to engage in the complete process. When people pursue possible careers, however, they often root them in a personal interest. Senior Hannah Chernin, for example, has found a passion for organizing and explains that her dream job would be a professional organizer. Chernin enjoys interacting with people and says, “It’s fun to work with them and help them create their vision. Organization is also different for everyone and it would be fun to see them happy.” Because of her interest in having a job with constant social interactions, Chernin is choosing to major in communications to pursue her passion for forming personal connections with others.

To many, finding what one is passionate about comes naturally. It may have been a particular experience or person that sparked an interest. Freshman Andrew Myerson explained that his love for soccer stemmed from his mom signing him up for the sport and then his “coach was the one who basically got [him] into it so much.” Myerson explained, “And then I had him for four years and every year I just loved the game even more. To be honest, that’s why I love it so much.” Many students I interviewed explained that their interest in a school subject originated from a positive experience with a particular teacher that was passionate about what they were teaching.

However, it can be challenging for some individuals to find what they are passionate about. Is it too overwhelming to attempt to experience every possible potential interest? Many believe that there is really no harm in trying when one is younger. If an individual tries a dance class and hates it, there typically is no harm in moving on to the next activity. Senior Mikey Redding says, “I think that it’s important to expose yourself to as much as you can. Get a feel for it and you can learn about so many different things from other sources.” Redding stresses that even though “you should experience things firsthand,” if one wants to get a basic understanding of a particular interest, looking online is a great resource. Doing research into possible interests could lead to a passion that an individual pursues for the rest on their life.

There are various ways in which people can pursue the passions that they have. In school, especially in high school and college, there are particular classes one can take that reflect one’s interests. Junior Kirsten Romero is interested in pursuing medicine and is thus taking Bio Medicine and Sports Medicine to enhance her exposure to the field. Schools also offer a plethora of clubs that pertain to people’s interests. Outside of school, there are endless possibilities to activities that allow people to express what they are passionate about.

However, despite having various opportunities to pursue what interests them, The New York Times explains that “two out of three working Americans do not feel engaged at work” and often are unhappy with their current jobs. A majority of people report to be unsatisfied with their employment. And yet people are often afraid to change their jobs. They rationalize that other factors, such as salary and employee benefits, outweigh pursuing a profession they are passionate about. Personally, sophomore Evan Worsfold says “I don’t think I would put my salary over something I’m passionate about. Because if I enjoy my job but don’t get a lot of money out of it, then I’m still happy.” Choosing a higher salary in a profession one is not passionate about leads to an unmotivated workforce. Sophomore Mia Wenette summarizes, “Let’s take the example of school. Students either love school or hate school; you either do well in it or you don’t. If you have a job, and you’re not doing well in it, then you’re obviously not going to like your job.” Wenette also emphasizes that it is important to not over exert oneself as too much stress leads to severe repercussions to one’s mental and physical health.

Job dissatisfaction often arises when an individual becomes bored with what they are doing. Junior Myles Cash, for example, is currently working at Target and he has grown disinterested with the job; “I think that’s a lot of it, getting bored of the repetition. It’s the same thing; stocking things over and over again.” Finding a job that both encompasses one’s strengths and passions is often challenging, but worth it in the long run. Individuals fear breaking from routine or vindicate that it is too late in their life to do so.  An article from CNN tells the story of Geraldo De-Souza, who “spent the first 20 years of his professional life selling insurance.” However, people who stop him in the street and ask about is neckwear, which he decided to turn his passion of designing “flamboyant bow ties” into a business. Although there may be some risks associated with changing professions, the potential dangers are overpowered by a feeling of fulfillment from pursuing one’s passions.

Savannah Wood, Copy Editor

Second-year journalist, class of 2019, Disneyland enthusiast and will drop anything to pet a dog. Sometimes runs, but usually out of money. Lives for green...

Mimi Gaudiano, Illustrator

Class of 2019. Long time artist, first time journalistic illustrator. Grade ‘A’ Disaster Gay. Owner of a wandering mind (if found please return to...

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